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William Thomas Shore and Ianthe (Talbott) Shore

Albertus Arthur Shore and Sarah Susanna (Brady) Shore


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  William Thomas Shore  and  Ianthe (Talbott) Shore

William Thomas Shore was born 16 Apr 1846 in La Fayette, Stark County, Illinois.  He is the son of John Shore  and  Mary Ann (Brandenburg) Shore.

William's father came from Wiltshire, England; his mother was born in Frederick County, Maryland.

William Thomas might have been named after his grandfathers:  Mary Ann's father is William Brandenburg, and John Shore's father is Thomas Shore.

The Shore family were early settlers in Stark County, Illinois.  Land deeds show them purchasing 82.64 acres of Federal land in 1839, and a block of land in La Fayette in 1840, and with additional properties in the next several years in both Stark County and Knox County.

La Fayette, Illinois remains a small community.  The town's population was 227 in the US Census for the year 2000.

Ianthe Talbott was born about 1856 in White Cloud (Arkoe), Nodaway County, Missouri.  She is a daughter of Perry Hoshor Talbott  and  Belle (McFarland) Talbott.

Ianthe's father was a physician in the town of Arkoe, Nodaway County.  Her father and mother came from Ohio (where her grandfather also was a physician).  Today the town of Arkoe has a "Talbot" Street and a "Belle" Street.

Arkoe, Missouri remains a small community, with a population of 58 in the US Census for the year 2000.

William Thomas Shore and Ianthe (Talbott) Shore are the parents of Jesse Perry Shore, from whom our family is descended.

In the Civil War, William served in Company F of the 112th Illinois Volunteer Infantry, enlisting on 19 Feb 1863.  He was then 16 years and 10 months of age.  He was wounded at the battle of Resaca, Georgia on 14 May 1864.  He spent 12 months in hospitals in Chattanooga and Knoxville, Tennessee, and was discharged on 13 May 1865.

After his discharge he worked as a farmer with a land holding (1870 census), and later as a farm laborer (1880 census).  He had contracted a serious illness during the war and was receiving a military veterans disability pension for it.  The illness gradually worsened until he died at age 52, in 1898.  More information is in the Documents section below.

William Thomas Shore was twice married.  Both of his marriages are described below.

 


 

1.  William Thomas Shore's first marriage was to Caroline Mary Dick.

Caroline was born on 26 December 1852.  Her parents are Adam and Mary Lovice (Pomeroy) Dick.

Caroline is shown as "Cora" in our family's records.  She is also "Cora" in her burial record and on her headstone.

William and Cora were married on 16 September 1868.  William was 22 years of age, Cora not yet 16.

They had two children:

  • Winfred Thomas Shore (b. 18 Sep 1869, d. 1 Nov 1886)
  • Cora Mary Shore (b. 17 Aug 1871, d. 1 Jul 1873)

Home and Farm:   An 1870 Illinois farm record shows William Shore living on 80 acres of land with crops and livestock.

1870 Farm:    William and Cora Shore.

The image includes a blank record for readability.

Their farm is next to the farms of Richard Baker and Adam Dick.

Richard Baker is the husband of William's mother Mary Ann (Brandenburg) Shore.  Adam and Mary Dick are Cora's parents.

William is the farm's "Agent, Owner or Manager".  He has 80 acres.  The farm's value is $4000, with $75 worth of farm implements.  He has 3 horses, 2 "milch cows", 1 "other cattle", and 8 "swine", total value $339.

He has 130 bushels of "spring wheat", 500 bushels of "Indian corn", and 460 bushels of oats.

He has 20 bushels of Irish potatoes, $25 worth of "orchard products", and 200 pounds of butter.

He also has produced $90 worth of "animals slaughtered or sold for slaughter".

The 1870 record shows $610 as the "Estimated value of all farm production, including betterments and additions to stock".

Caroline (the mother) died on 2 September 1871, two weeks after giving birth to their daughter.  She was not yet 18 years of age.

On the mother's death, the infant daughter Cora was taken into the home of William's sister, Louisa Cedelia (Shore) Winn.  The baby survived just 1 year and 10 months.

Their son Winfred, less than two years old, was taken into the home of William's mother, Mary Ann (Brandenburg) Shore-Baker.  He died at the age of 17 years.

The years 1866 to 1873 must have been difficult for the Adam and Mary Dick family.

The 1860 U.S. Federal Census shows them with two children:  Caroline age 7 years, and Edward age 3.

The 1870 census shows them with four more children:  Henry (age 9), Andrew (7), Elijah (4), and Loretta (2).

Their son Edward had died on 30 July 1866 at 9 years and 9 months of age.  He is buried at the Himes Cemetery, La Fayette, Illinois near to where the Dick family lived.

Their daughter Caroline (Cora) married William Thomas Shore on 16 September 1868, giving birth to Winfred in September 1869, and to Cora Mary in August 1871, then dying just two weeks later at less than 18 years of age.

In September 1872 Adam and Mary Dick sold their land to Mary Ann Baker, William Shore's mother:  30 acres for $1900.  Adam and Mary Dick signed the deed on 10 September 1872.

Those 30 acres sold by Adam and Mary Dick are located between 10 acres owned by Philinda Pomeroy (Mary Dick's relative) and 80 acres owned by Mary Ann Baker's husband R.C. Baker (William Shore's stepfather).

Here is an 1873 map showing those three properties, together with a modern aerial photograph.  The land that had belonged to the Dick family is now owned by M.A. Baker.

Map and photograph:    M.A. Baker (30 acres),  R.C. Baker (80 acres), Pomeroy (10 acres).

William Thomas Shore buried his young wife after less than three years of marriage, and buried both of their children during his lifetime.

Cora Shore, their daughter Cora, and their son Winfred are buried in the Himes Cemetery, La Fayette, Illinois.  Memorials mark the mother's and son's graves; none has been found for the infant daughter.

Cora's memorial shows clasped hands, and:

FAREWELL
She was a kind and affectionate wife,
a fond mother, and a friend to all.

1860 US Federal Census
(Dick)

1870 US Federal Census
(Dick)

1870 US Federal Census
(Shore)

Space
available

Family Heritage
by Jesse Shore

Document

Family

Cora

Detail

Winfred

Cemetery

Detail

Cora

Cora

Detail

Family

Records

 


 

2.  William Thomas Shore's second marriage was to Ianthe Talbott.

Ianthe was born about 1856 in White Cloud township (now Arkoe), Nodaway County, Missouri.  Her parents are Perry and Belle (McFarland) Talbott.

William and Ianthe were married on 5 October 1873, in Polk Township, Maryville, Nodaway County, Missouri.  William was 27 years of age, and Ianthe 17.

Here is their Marriage Record.   Zoom

Our family is descended from their marriage.

William was from La Fayette, Stark County, Illinois, and Ianthe from White Cloud, Nodaway County, Missouri -- some 300 miles apart.  How they met, and any correspondence they might have had, are not presently known.

They had two children:

  • Albertus Arthur Shore (b. 28 Nov 1874, d. 9 Aug 1928)
  • Jesse Perry Shore (b. 31 Mar 1877, d. 19 Aug 1950)

Ianthe Shore died on 1 Feb 1880 at age 23, leaving the two sons.

Albertus Shore was taken into the home of their grandmother, Mary Ann (Brandenburg) Shore-Baker.  He was 5 years of age.

Jesse Shore was taken into the home of their aunt, Louisa Cedelia (Shore) Winn.  He was 2 years and 10 months of age.

The families and lives of the two sons Albertus Shore and Jesse Shore are described in their own sections of our Family Gallery.


Thus William Thomas Shore and Ianthe (Talbott) Shore are our direct ancestors.

William and Ianthe Shore are the father and mother of:

  • Jesse Perry Shore, 1877-1950

... and they are the grandfather and grandmother of

  • Mary Louise (Shore) Green, 1907-1990
  • Margaret Ann (Shore) Roberts, 1910-2004
  • Jessie Kathryn (Shore) Kollenberg, 1912-2000

Sometime after the death of his wife Ianthe in 1880, William moved from Stark County, Illinois to Tarkio, Atchison County, Missouri.  Correspondence from the early 1890s is addressed to him there.

When and why William moved there is not presently known.  His mother Mary Ann Shore-Baker died in 1892.  His son Albertus, grown to adulthood, was living in Tarkio.  Tarkio, Atchison County, is about 30 miles from Ianthe's birthplace in White Cloud, Nodaway County, where she and William were married.

William Thomas Shore died on 18 Oct 1898, at age 52.

  Documents

All of these Family Documents are shown below.

Census records:

US Federal Census records are shown here for William Thomas Shore and Ianthe (Talbott) Shore.

William Shore:

The 1850 US Federal Census (Stark County, Illinois) shows William Thomas Shore as a 4-year old child.  It also shows him as having attended school within the year.  The census is shown below.

The 1870 US Federal Census (Stark County, Illinois) shows William Thomas Shore, now age 23, married to his first wife Cora  M. Shore, age 17.  They have a son, Winfred T. Shore, age 9 months.  The census is shown below.

This 1870 census also shows William T. Shore and his mother Mary Ann (Brandenburg) Shore-Baker as neighbors in two homesteads.

Mary Ann's land is valued separately from her husband Richard Baker's, and it has the same value as her son William Shore's land.  John Shore willed his estate to his wife Mary Ann for her "natural life", stipulating that after her death it would be given equally to each of their children.  It isn't known whether she deeded part of the land to William, or he acquired it on his own.

The 1870 census is the last one showing William Shore's first wife, Cora.  She died a year later in Sep 1871, two weeks after giving birth to their daughter.

William Shore remarried in Oct 1873.

The 1880 US Federal Census (Stark County, Illinois) shows William T. Shore employed as a Farm Laborer, living in the J.A. Williams household.  The census is shown below.

J.A. Williams' wife Ida was the daughter of Richard C. Baker, whom Mary Ann Shore had married in 1862 following the death of her husband (William Shore's father), John Shore in 1861.

The 1880 census shows William T. Shore no longer holding the land he owned in 1870.

Note:  The 1880 census image is hard to read.  W. T. Shore is on line 38.

In the 1880 census, William Shore's second wife, Ianthe (Talbott) Shore, does not appear.  Ianthe had died on 1 Feb 1880, five months before the 1880 census was taken.  She was 23 years old.  In the census, her two sons are now living with their grandmother and aunt.

In addition to the 1880 census images, a transcript shows the family living in the three households:  Baker, Williams, and Winn.

Ianthe Talbott:

The 1860 US Federal Census (Nodaway County, Missouri) shows Ianthe Talbott as a four-year-old child.  She is living at home with her father and mother, Perry Talbott and Belle (McFarland) Talbott.  The census is shown below.

The 1870 US Federal Census (Nodaway County, Missouri) shows Ianthe Talbott now as a 14-year old girl, at home with her parents.  The census is shown below.

Note:  The 1870 census is not very readable.  The Talbott family appears on lines 28 through 38.  Ianthe is on line 31.

The town of Arkoe has a 'Talbott' Cemetery, and has two streets named 'Talbot' and 'Belle'.

The 1880 US Federal Census (Stark County, Illinois) shows Ianthe's 19-year-old sister, Alice Talbott, living as a Housekeeper at a neighbor's house in La Fayette Village, Illinois.  Alice, like Ianthe, was born in Nodaway County, Missouri.  Perhaps she had come the 300 miles to La Fayette Village to be with Ianthe before she died.  Alice Talbott's entry in the 1880 census is shown below.  (Alice was living in the McClenahan house; later, she married George McClenahan.)

Other documents:

Numerous documents in the family's heritage have survived by being preserved and passed down by William and Ianthe Shore's son, Jesse Perry Shore (1877-1950).

A photograph shows William's parents John and Mary Ann Shore, with William as a small child.  The photograph dates from about 1850.  It is shown below.

Another photograph shows William Thomas Shore in his uniform of the 112th Illinois Volunteer Infantry.  It dates from about 1863-64.  It is shown below.

No photographs have been found so far showing Ianthe Talbott or her family, and none has been found so far showing William and Ianthe (Talbott) Shore together with their family.

A receipt bears the signature "William Thomas Shore" for two purchases of a hundred pounds of flour -- at $3.50 per 100 lbs., "paid 2 dollars".  The purchases are dated 25 Jul and 29 Jul 1859.  At that time he was 13 years of age.  It is shown below.

Land Deeds:

A land deed dated 21 Feb 1874 grants Ianthe Shore a plot of land in Nodaway County, Missouri.  The land is given to her by her parents Perry Talbott and Belle Talbott "to her sole and separate use free from the interference or control of her present or any future husband during her natural life time and at her death to her heirs and their assigns forever."  It is shown below.

A quit-claim deed and correspondence in 1907 between William and Ianthe Shore's son Jesse Shore and a Missouri attorney shows that Ianthe's land covered 80 acres, and in 1907 a part of that land was being occupied by a person who is not in the family.  The attorney advises Jesse Shore that Jesse has "no interest in the land that you could enforce in the Court of Law or Equity" and offers him the sum of $10 to relinquish the family's claims to the land.  (The deed itself mentions $5 reimbursement.)  These documents are shown below.

Military records:

William Shore's military records are shown below.  He enlisted on 19 Feb 1863.  He was then 16 years and 10 months of age.  He was wounded on 14 May 1864, one month after his 18th birthday.  After twelve months in hospitals, he was discharged at Knoxville, Tennessee on 13 May 1865.

William's father (John Shore) had died on 7 Mar 1861, five weeks before William's 15th birthday.  That left his mother with William and his two sisters (another sister had died in infancy).  His mother remarried on 1 Jan 1862.

One can imagine how the family may have felt -- in discussions and prayers -- about the 16-year-old William going off to war.  If letters were written, so far none has been found.

Here is a history of the   112th Illinois Infantry Regiment.

William was in each engagement up to his being wounded at the Resaca battlefield on 14 May 1864.

After William's wound at Resaca he spent twelve months in hospitals at Chattanooga and Knoxville, Tennessee, so letters might have been written in the family then.  If any letters have survived, they have not yet been found.

Maps and reports of the battle are shown below.

A map shows the area where his unit was engaged against the Confederate lines.  Today Interstate highway 75 runs directly through that area.

His commander's official report describes how the men advanced with bayonets on a 200-yard wide front across an open farm field, while the Confederate artillery opened on them from left and right and the Confederate infantry, dug into trenches on the hillside ahead, fired directly upon them.

The Confederate report describes the men of William's unit advancing toward them across the open field as a "harvest" for their rifles.

An 1864 photograph shows the position where William's unit began their advance.

   1864 Resaca Battlefield      Official Battle Report

The Confederate lines were entrenched on the high ground in the distance.  William's unit's orders were to advance across the open field and take the high ground.

The limbs stripped from the trees show the intensity of the Confederate artillery barrage against the Union infantry's advance.

Here is an account of the battle from a Regimental history.  William was in Reilly's brigade, the unit leading the advance.

   Resaca Battle Account

An officer's letter from the battlefield describes the scene and mentions William as one who was slightly wounded.  (He is shown with his middle name 'Thomas Shore' in the letter.)

   Resaca Letter

Here is a newspaper article published a week after the battle.  The paragraph "GEN. COX'S DIVISION", about halfway down the page, describes the charge by William's unit.

   Newspaper Article

The newspaper article describes how "A cheer went up from his boys, and resounded through the hills as his serried line advanced upon the enemy's works, which they carried at the point of the bayonet in splendid style; but not without the loss of many brave men."

Here is another 1864 photograph.  It shows some of the Confederates' earthworks commanding the high ground.

   1864 Resaca Battlefield

Here is a map of the battlefield.

   Battlefield Map

This map shows his regiment's position as they advanced.

   Infantry's Advance

Here is a modern aerial photograph.  It shows the open field and creek they crossed, advancing against the Confederates' trenches and artillery.

   Aerial Photograph

Here is an 1864 drawing of the battle, together with a modern photograph of the field from the Confederates' side.

   Combined View

Here are letters written by men in the battle, and another newspaper article.  One letter mentions the charge in which William was wounded.

   Resaca Notes

Mary Bickerdyke was a volunteer nurse for the Union army.  Known as "Mother Bickerdyke" to the troops, she arrived at Resaca at the peak of the battle and cared for the wounded.  She might have dressed William Shore's wounds before he was evacuated to Knoxville.

Here is a later photograph of her, with an account of her arrival upon the Resaca battlefield.

   Mary Bickerdyke at Resaca

More battlefield maps and battle reports are shown in the images below.

Also, a newspaper column about the battle, written 50 years later, is shown below.

The infantry badge shown below is from William Shore.  He served in Company F, 112th Illinois Regiment, 3rd Division, 23rd Army Corps.

The badge measures about 4-1/8 inches across.  The insignia has an eagle and a "23" shield on a pair of crossed rifles.

The back has two screw posts for mounting.  It might have been mounted on a piece of equipment, perhaps on a ceremonial piece.  The badge was kept wrapped in a piece of white silk, which was then wrapped in the piece of camouflage cloth shown in the photos.  It was kept this way by William's son Jesse Shore, then given to Jesse's grandson Joseph Roberts.

The military sword shown in the images below is complete with its scabbard.

The sword is about 36 inches long.  Its blade is inscribed with the initials "U.S".  Its hilt has an emblem of a U.S. Army shield with crossed flags.  It also has the insignias of crossed swords (Cavalry), cannons (Artillery), and rifles (Infantry).  The handle and hilt has a built-in whistle.  The sword was kept by William's son Jesse Shore, then given to Jesse's grandson Joseph Roberts, and then to Jesse's grandson James Roberts.  The sword's purpose, whether used in action or ceremonial, is not known.  Its original owner is not known.

A Civil War infantryman's powder horn is also shown in the images below.  It belonged to William Thomas Shore.   The powder horn was kept by William's son Jesse Shore, then given to Jesse's grandson Carl Thomas Green.

Photos are shown below also of a 1990 visit to the Resaca battlefield and to the Confederate Cemetery at Resaca.

One of the signposts is near the area where William Shore's unit was positioned before their advance.

More photos and a map are shown below, taken on a 2005 visit.

Several of the 2005 photos are panoramas.  They show the field where William Shore's unit advanced and took the Confederate positions.  More photos show the field as it was seen from the Confederate high ground.  They show some of the Confederate trenches, still there.

William T. Shore's military pension and medical records are shown below.

On 27 Jun 1890, the Congress passed an Act allowing war veterans to apply for an "Invalid Pension" as a result of a war-inflicted wound or disease.  On 26 Jul 1890, William applied for a partial pension, owing partly to his wound but mostly to an increasing sickness which he had contracted during the war.

He had spent one month in hospital at Chattanooga, and eleven months in hospital in Knoxville, before his discharge from service.  Doctors' reports describe him as "emaciated and prematurely aged", with his weight declining to 117 pounds one year before his death.

He received a partial disability pension of 6 dollars per month in 1892.  In 1897 he was approved for a full disability pension (of 8 dollars per month), but died in 1898 before receiving it.

All of these medical and pension records are shown below.

According to his pension records, from 1890 William was living at Tarkio, Atchison County, Missouri.  That is about 30 miles from Ianthe's birthplace in White Cloud, Nodaway County.  Also, William and Ianthe were married in Nodaway County.

Why William returned about 300 miles to the vicinity of his marriage to Ianthe, instead of remaining with the rest of his family in Illinois, is not known.  He might have returned there to be near his son Albertus Shore, who was then living at Tarkio.  Whether it was related to William's worsening medical condition and disability, is not known.

Currently nothing more is known about William and Ianthe Shore's brief lifetime together.

Burial records:

William is buried at the Tarkio Home Cemetery, located on the south side of the town of Tarkio, Atchison County, Missouri.  His obituary and photographs of his headstone and grave are below.  The obituary includes a card of thanks from his sons Albertus Arthur Shore and Jesse Perry Shore.

Ianthe is buried at the Talbott Family Cemetery, located about a half mile northwest of the town of Arkoe, Nodaway County, Missouri.  The cemetery is on land that was part of the Talbott family farm.

A drawing of the cemetery appeared in the Nodaway Democrat newspaper of 28 July 1881, reporting the burial of two Talbott sons.  The newspaper's article shows the location of Ianthe's grave.

Today her grave has no headstone or marker.  A small rectangular stone is there, possibly the foundation for a headstone.  It is in the approximate location shown for Ianthe's grave in the 1881 newspaper article.

The newspaper article states that she "died a year ago last March", which is probably incorrect.  A family heritage document made by her son Jesse Perry Shore (1877-1950) shows she died on February 1, 1880.  (The newspaper also gives another date incorrectly, for a child who was Ianthe's sister.)

The 1881 newspaper article and modern photographs of the cemetery are below.

The cemetery is difficult to find on maps.  Its coordinates are:   N 40.26636   W 94.84786

William and Ianthe had been living 300 miles away in Stark County, Illinois where their two children were born.  Why they traveled that distance back to Missouri, to the Talbott family home where she had been born, is not known.  At age 23, with her two children less than six years and three years of age, possibly she died in complications of another birth.  Her father Perry Talbott was a famous physician -- perhaps she had needed his care.

Our relationship:

Today, everyone in our family comes from the brief lifetime William and Ianthe shared, or is married to someone who came from them.

Perhaps we can find out more about who they were, and we can learn how they lived through the powerful events in their lives.

They are Your Family.
Please Help us to learn about them.


La Fayette, Illinois
Aerial Photos
1  2

La Fayette, Illinois
Area Map

1850 US Federal Census
(Shore)

1870 US Federal Census
(Shore)

1880 US Federal Census
(Shore)
Image
Transcript

Arkoe, Missouri
Aerial Photos
1  2  3

Arkoe, Missouri
Town Map

1860 US Federal Census
(Talbott)

1870 US Federal Census
(Talbott)

1880 US Federal Census
(Alice Talbott)

Image
Transcript

1850
John Shore,
Mary Ann Shore,
William T. Shore
Outer

1850
John Shore,
Mary Ann Shore,
William T. Shore
Inner

1850
John Shore,
Mary Ann Shore,
William T. Shore
Photo

1850
John Shore,
Mary Ann Shore,
William T. Shore
Zoom 1

1850
John Shore,
Mary Ann Shore,
William T. Shore
Zoom 2

1863
William T. Shore
Outer

1863
William T. Shore
Inner

1863
William T. Shore
Photo

1863
William T. Shore
Zoom 1
Zoom 2

Abt. 1890
William T. Shore
Front
Back

1859
William (Age 13)
Receipt
for Flour

21 Feb 1874
Ianthe
Land Deed
Page  1  2

12 Aug 1874
Ianthe
Land Deed
Page  1  2

1 Oct 1907
Jesse Shore
Letter from
Attorney
Page  1  2

Nov 1907
Jesse Shore
Quit-Claim
Deed
Page  1  2  3

112th Illinois Volunteers
Service Summary


Complete History

Resaca Letter

Battle Account

More Letters

Infantryman's
Powder Horn
Powder Horn

23rd Army Corps
Infantry Badge
Front  Back


Military
Sword
1  2  3  4  5

Battle of Resaca
Notes

1864 Resaca
Battlefield


Official Battle Report

Newspaper column
Battle of Resaca
50 yrs later

1990 Resaca
1  2  3  4
5  6  7

1990 Resaca
8  9  10
11  12

Battle of Resaca
Map and Images

Battle of Resaca
Panorama 1

Battle of Resaca
Panorama 2

Battle of Resaca
Panorama 3

CSA Trenches
1  2  3

Medical Record
Page 1  2  3

Medical Record
Page 4  5  6

Medical Record
Page 7  8  9

Medical Record
Page 10  11  12

Medical Record
Page 13  14  15

Medical Record
Page 16  17  18

Medical Record
Page 19  20  21

Medical Record
Page 22  23  24

Medical
Pension

Family Heritage
by Jesse Shore

Document

Tarkio
Historical Society
Letter

William T. Shore
Obituary and
Card from Sons

William
Thomas
Shore
1  2  3  4  5  6

Ianthe
(Talbott)
Shore - ???
1  2  3  4  5

Ianthe Burial Site
Nodaway
Democrat
28 Jul 1881
Newspaper Page
Zoom  1  2

20 June 2017


 

 

  Albertus Arthur Shore  and  Sarah Susanna (Brady) Shore

Albertus Arthur Shore was born 28 Nov 1874 in La Fayette, Stark County, Illinois.  He was a son of William Thomas Shore  and  Ianthe (Talbott) Shore.

Sarah Susanna Brady was born 29 Jan 1871 in Fillmore, Andrew County, Missouri.  She was a daughter of John and Sarah Martha (Cooper) Brady.

Albertus's birthplace is listed in US Federal Census records as Missouri, but his death certificate shows it as La Fayette, Illinois.  He was reared there by his grandmother Mary Ann (Brandenburg) Shore on the death of his mother in 1880.

Sarah Susanna is listed in US Federal Census records as "Sarah", and in her burial record by her nickname "Sallie".

Her name is shown as "Sarah Susanna Shore" on the Death Certificate for Albertus.

Albertus and Sarah were married on 23 September 1908 in Plattsmouth, Nebraska.

Here is their wedding party:  Albertus and Sallie Marriage

The writing is difficult to read.  It is signed "Yours S.S.":   Handwritten Text

Seated second from the left is Leona (Brady), the bride's sister.  Next are Albertus and Sarah.  The others are not identified.

Albertus and Sarah had one daughter, Edna Ianthe Shore, born 15 October 1909.

Albertus is the brother of Jesse Perry Shore, from whom our family is descended.  Albertus and Jesse had no other brothers or sisters.

Albertus' and Jesse's mother Ianthe Shore died on 1 Feb 1880 at age 23, leaving the two sons, ages 5 and 2.

On the mother's death, Albertus Shore was taken into the home of their grandmother, Mary Ann (Brandenburg) Shore-Baker.  He was 5 years of age.

Jesse Shore was taken into the home of their aunt, Louisa Cedelia (Shore) Winn.  He was 2 years and 10 months of age.

Their father William Thomas Shore died on 18 Oct 1898, at age 52.

Albertus and Sarah 'Sallie' Shore are uncle and aunt to:

  • Mary Louise (Shore) Green, 1907-1990
  • Margaret Ann (Shore) Roberts, 1910-2004
  • Jessie Kathryn (Shore) Kollenberg, 1912-2000

  ... and Albertus's and Sarah's daughter Edna Ianthe Shore, 1909-1984, is their first cousin.

Albertus Arthur Shore died 9 Aug 1928.

Sarah Susanna Shore died 24 May 1952.

Their daughter Edna I. Shore died 9 Mar 1984.  She remained unmarried.

The family is buried at High Creek Cemetery, Watson, Atchison County, Missouri.

  Documents

All of these Family Documents are shown below.

Census records:

US Federal Census records are shown below for Albertus and Sarah ('Sallie') Shore and their daughter Edna Ianthe Shore.

Census records show Albertus as born in Missouri, but his death certificate shows his birthplace as La Fayette, Illinois.

Census records are also shown for Sallie's parents, John and Sarah Martha (Cooper) Brady.

The 1900 US Federal Census (Atchison County, Missouri) shows Albertus Shore unmarried, age 25, living at Tarkio.  He is shown as owning his home, free of any mortgage.  His profession is shown as Stationary Engineer.  Albertus is on line 91.

The 1900 US Federal Census shows Sarah Susanna Shore unmarried, age 29, living at Washington Township, Buchanan County, Missouri.

The 1900 US Federal Census shows Sarah's parents, John and Sarah Martha (Cooper) Brady, living at Watson, Atchison County, Missouri.  The Census shows that they had been married 31 years and had 12 children, with 10 still living in 1900.

The 1910 US Federal Census (Carroll County, Missouri) shows Albertus Shore and his family.  They are living at West Fourth Street, Egypt Township, Norborne Town, Missouri.  They are listed as "Bert" and Sallie", married two years.  Their daughter Edna is shown as "6/12" years (six months).  Albertus's profession is shown as Engineer at a Light Plant.  The family is on line 27.

The 1920 US Federal Census (Carroll County, Missouri) shows Albertus Shore and his family.  They are living at 300 West Second Street, Egypt Township, Norborne Town, Missouri.  They are shown as renting the home.  The daughter Edna I. Shore is 10 years old.  Albertus's profession is shown as Electrician.  The family is on line 40.

The 1930 US Federal Census (Kansas City, Missouri) shows Sallie Shore (listed as "Shores") living as a lodger at 3043 Forest Avenue, Kansas City, Missouri.  She is on line 55.  Edna has not yet been found in the 1930 census.

The 1940 US Federal Census (Kansas City, Missouri) shows Sallie and Edna Shore living at 1107 Linwood Boulevard, Kansas city, Missouri.  They are on lines 1 and 2.

Other documents:

A record dated 12 September 1918 shows Albertus registering for the World War I draft.

A letter dated 29 September 1918 is written from Albertus to his brother Jesse Shore.  It mentions their father (William T. Shore, died 1898) saying that their grandfather (John Shore, died 1861) had said that other Shore family members had come to America.  It also mentions his wife and daughter visiting Sallie's mother, who was then ailing, in Plattsmouth, Nebraska.

Burial records:

Albertus survived until 1928, his wife Sarah ('Sallie') to 1952, and their daughter Edna to 1984.

Albertus's Death Certificate shows his father's name as "Thomas", and his mother's name as "Cora Talbot".  The mother's name is in error.  Cora (maiden name Dick) was William Thomas Shore's first wife, who had died in 1871.  William Thomas Shore then married Ianthe Talbott in 1873 and she was Albertus's mother, giving birth to Albertus in 1874.

Albertus's father was William Thomas Shore (d. 1898); his mother was Ianthe (Talbott) Shore (d. 1880).  Albertus was five years old when his mother Ianthe died.

Albertus's death certificate (1928) shows his wife Sarah as the Informant of record on his death.  Probably in 1928 she was not completely familiar with the name of his mother, who had died in 1880 when Albertus was a child.

Albertus Shore, Sarah Susanna Shore, and their daughter Edna Ianthe Shore are buried at the High Creek Cemetery, Watson, Atchison County, Missouri.

The cemetery's record book has this entry:

Shore, Albertus A 1874 - Aug 1928  wife Sallie S Brady   Masonic emblem

Edna I 15 Oct 1909 - 9 Mar 1984  dau of Albertus A & Sallie S BRADY Shore

Sallie S 29 Jan 1871 Fillmore MO - 24 May 1952  age 81y  husband Albertus A Shore   Dau of John & Martha Brady

Albertus and Sarah are uncle and aunt in our line of the Shore family.  Edna is our cousin.

After Edna died in 1984, we do not know what became of the Shore family records that were saved in our family.

The records would have been saved by William Thomas Shore, father of Albertus and Jesse.  He lived at Tarkio, Missouri, near his son Albertus Shore.

When William Thomas Shore died in 1898, probably all he had of the Shore family's Bible, photos, letters, records, and other items went to his son Albertus.

Then after Albertus married Sallie Brady (1908), probably the Shore family records were passed on to their only child, their daughter Edna Shore.

Edna Shore did not marry.  We do not know what became of the Shore family records after her death in 1984.

They are Your Family.
Please Help us to learn about them.


1900
US Federal Census
Albertus Shore

1900
US Federal Census
John and
Sarah Martha Brady


Sarah Susanna Brady

1910
US Federal Census
Albertus Shore

1920
US Federal Census
Albertus Shore

1930
US Federal Census
Sallie Shore


Zoom

1940
US Federal Census
Sallie and
Edna Shore


Zoom


30 Nov 1901

Brother
Search

John Brady

Sarah Martha
(Cooper) Brady

Sarah Martha
(Cooper) Brady

Abt. 1900
Sallie Brady

Abt. 1900
Sallie Brady

Abt. 1900
Albertus Shore

23 Sep 1908
Albertus and Sallie
Marriage


Text

Albertus and Sallie


Zoom

Abt. 1911
Edna Shore

Edna
and Friend

1918 Home
Albertus, Sallie,
and Edna

Letter from Albertus
to Jesse Shore
29 Sep 1918
Page  1  2  3
Text

1918
Albertus
Draft
Registration

Brady Family:
Sallie Shore,
Anna, Bob Brady

Brady Family:
Leona, Sallie Shore,
Anna, Pearl,
Gene, Bob Brady

Brady Family:
Anna Brady,
Sallie and Edna Shore,
Bob Brady

1935
Sallie Shore

Sallie, Edna,
and Aunt Maude

Edna

Edna
and Friend

Edna
and Cousin
Dean South

Edna
and Niece
Geraldean South

Edna

Space
available

Space
available

Space
available

High Creek
Cemetery

High Creek
Cemetery

John Brady

Sarah Martha
(Cooper) Brady

Space
available

Sallie and
Albertus Shore

Edna Shore

Albertus
Death
Certificate

Space
available

Sarah (Brady)
Shore
Death Notice

Sarah (Brady)
Shore
Obituary

Edna
Shore
Obituary

Tarkio
Historical Society
Letter

High Creek
Cemetery
Record

Space
available

Space
available

Space
available

3 November 2013


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